Movie Review: Three things The Train will do to you by Goodness Adegbola

The Train, Mount Zion’s latest movie, is a biopic based on the life of Mike Bamiloye. In seven chapters and close to three hours, the story of Mike Bamiloye is told from his childhood right into the early phase of his ministry. We follow his story from Ilesa to Lagos to Ile-Ife.

I can’t fault a true story because it’s reality but I can surely comment on how it’s told. I think the writing of The Train is great; there’s a steady build to the climax, the audience gets endeared to the protagonist and there are the unforeseen turns that characterizes real life. Another thing that makes the story come alive is the fact that the writer doesn’t get too obsessed with making a point and leaving out the mundane details that give spice to reality. I think Damilola Mike-Bamiloye did a good job of adapting the story for the screen.

The actors did well to deliver their roles believably. Every last one of them. Seun Adejumobi as the older Bro Mike is a natural. I have some personal favorites though. The first has to be younger Abayomi played by Oluwasola Peter; he holds promise as a good actor. He made it all too easy to love his silly character. The second is Tolulope Mike-Bamiloye as Sola. She’s beautiful in the role and beautiful for the role. She embodies that demure confident fire of her character perfectly. I just have to love Omolara Ayoola’s portrayal of Peju. Whether Peju was doing the right thing or not, the passion on her character is something. Gbeminiyi doesn’t have much screen time but I love the character and how John Oguntuase breathes life into it.

The impression of time and place is laudable in The Train. From costumes to diction, to locations. Everything merged perfectly to take the viewer on a vivid journey. The Ilesa dialect and culture shown in some of chapters is another delight to watch.

There was a scene in chapter 5 where Bro Mike’s audio doesn’t match the audio in other scenes. But I didn’t note anything unpardonable.

The pictures are beautiful. I had a lot of moments when I burst into laughter. The drama scenes in the movie are distinct from the movie. They carry the melodrama and cheesiness of stage drama and that jouncing car impression- brilliant!

The casting is meticulously done. Not only are the actors good in their roles, most of them look like the actual people they depict.

There are a lot of things to learn from the movie, I’ll just go ahead to share a few

  1. As a young boy, Abayomi starts trying to direct drama. It’s wise to observe the interests of children, especially as parents. They could be indicators of their life purpose.
  2. We all need someone to believe in us even when we don’t, like Peju believed in her brother.
  3. From chapter 2, I was touched again by the wonder of the glorious gospel. God knows us by name and he loves us.
  4. Well-meaning people could be zealously and passionately working against God’s purpose for you and all the while think they are doing you good.
  5. Still in line with the previous nugget; the fact that God spoke through someone’s lips in one minute, doesn’t mean they cannot air the Devil’s opinion the next. Ask Simon Peter, ask Peju.
  6. The enemy will fight tooth and nail against your purpose because he knows that in it lies your relevance and fulfillment and of course, his destruction.

After watching this movie yesterday, passion was ignited in me for purpose and I was driven to pray.

How can I even forget to mention the theme song? Jaymikee and Lawrence Oyor brought fire and chills with that song and the chant.

People are different but I can almost assure you that anyone watching The Train will experience these three:

  1. You will laugh
  2. You will be blessed/ ministered to
  3. You will be moved/ get emotional/ cry.

The Train is still on YouTube. If you haven’t seen it, what exactly are you’re waiting for?

Leave a Reply

Your e-mail address will not be published. Required fields are marked *